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Default memory cache usage?

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kiop
 
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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 1:43 pm

Hi, I saw on the Unofficial Phoenix FAQ that you can specify the amount of memory cache for Phoenix to use in the user.js file. ( http://texturizer.net/phoenix/tips.html )

I was wondering how much Phoenix uses by default?

Thanks.

djst
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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 1:48 pm

kiop wrote:Hi, I saw on the Unofficial Phoenix FAQ that you can specify the amount of memory cache for Phoenix to use in the user.js file. ( http://texturizer.net/phoenix/tips.html )

I was wondering how much Phoenix uses by default?

Thanks.


4096KB. Or 4MB if you prefer. :)

kiop
 
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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 1:52 pm

Thanks.

Stefan

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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 3:41 pm

djst wrote:4096KB


What's that? 4096 Kelvin Bytes? ;)

Duey
 
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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 4:33 pm

Stefan wrote:What's that? 4096 Kelvin Bytes? ;)


It's whatever Phoenix uses. Open up chrome://communicator/content/pref/pref.xul (if it still works), go to Advanced/Cache and you will see KB.

Duey

laszlo

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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 4:39 pm

Duey wrote:
Stefan wrote:What's that? 4096 Kelvin Bytes? ;)

It's whatever Phoenix uses. Open up chrome://communicator/content/pref/pref.xul (if it still works), go to Advanced/Cache and you will see KB.
Duey

Stefan's humor seems to differ from yours :wink:
Anyway: kB = 1000 bytes, KB = 1024 bytes.

Duey
 
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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 5:16 pm

laszlo wrote:Stefan's humor seems to differ from yours :wink:


Oh, heh, sorry, subtle things usually go way over my head. :)

Duey

Stefan

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Post Posted November 10th, 2002, 10:02 pm

laszlo wrote:Anyway: kB = 1000 bytes, KB = 1024 bytes.


Well, k = 1000, but there is actually no spec that sais K = 1024.

And that is sais KB in Mozilla, well the american programer that wrote it probably never used learned about SI units in school ;)

GNU/Ben

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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 5:33 am

If I remember right, it had something to do with hex. Or was it binary?

Stefan

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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 6:34 am

Benman wrote:If I remember right, it had something to do with hex. Or was it binary?


2^10 = 1024 which is close enough to kilo (1000) so that people started using the shorter 1k notation after a while.
Obviously having k mean 1000 as well as 1024 is far from optimal (HDs and networking eg uses 1000, while memory uses 1024) as there is a high risk of confusion.
Sadly the standards organizations havn't managed to come up with (or rather agreed upon) a good alternative replacment yet (though there are a number of suggestions).
Last edited by Stefan on November 11th, 2002, 8:32 am, edited 2 times in total.

djst
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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 8:27 am

Stefan wrote:
djst wrote:4096KB


What's that? 4096 Kelvin Bytes? ;)


k stands for kilo, which is 1000. One kilogram is 1000 grams. One kilometer is 1000 metres. Somehow, the americans decided to use K for kilobytes. Maybe because 1024 != 1000, or maybe because they didn't like the appearance of kB? I really don't know. K is really short for Kelvin, not kilo, and in fact, the Swedish version of Windows is using kB instead of KB.

Ted Mielczarek
 
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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 8:31 am

Stefan wrote:
Benman wrote:If I remember right, it had something to do with hex. Or was it binary?


2^8 = 1024 which is close enough to kilo (1000) so that people started using the shorter 1k notation after a while.
Obviously having k mean 1000 as well as 1024 is far from optimal (HDs and networking eg uses 1000, while memory uses 1024) as there is a high risk of confusion.
Sadly the standards organizations havn't managed to come up with a good alternative replacment yet (though there are a number of suggestions).


http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Kibibyte.html

Yes, I think it sounds stupid too. Also it means that hard drive manufacturers can continue labelling drives as "80 Gb" when your OS will report them as less.

Ted Mielczarek
 
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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 8:34 am

More appropriate link: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html

Didn't notice that link on the Mathworld site.

Stefan

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Post Posted November 11th, 2002, 8:36 am

Jepp, but if you look at the reference for that page you can read

"It is important to recognize that the new prefixes for binary multiples are not part of the International System of Units (SI), the modern metric system."

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